Panoramic Photos with Photo Stitching Errors

Stitching errors are a common problem in panoramic photography, where the photo stitching software made a mistake in lining up the images when it stitched them together. After stitching your panorama you might see some places where objects have been distorted, misaligned or cut in half during the panorama stitching process. This article describes what causes the problem, and suggests some ways to solve it.

Panoramic Photos with Ghosting or Double Images

Here’s a problem that often occurs in panoramic photography when the scene you’ve captured contains some movement, like people, clouds, or boats on a river. After stitching your panorama you might see some ‘ghosts’ or transparent double images in the areas of the panoramic photo where two adjacent pictures overlap. This article describes what causes the problem, and suggests some ways to solve it.

Panoramic Photos with Vignetting or Dark Corners

Vignetting is a problem that some cameras have, where the picture gets noticeably darker in the very corners of the frame. In panoramic photography, when a series of photos suffering from vignetting are stitched together into a panorama, the result can be a series of curved dark areas at the top and bottom of the panoramic photo where the frames have been joined together. This article describes what causes the problem, and lays out 6 different ways to correct it.

Panoramic Photos with Visible Seams or Vertical Bands

The problem of visible seams or light and dark vertical bands in a stitched panoramic photo, is one that is encountered by many beginning panoramic photographers. This article describes what causes the problem, and lays out an easy 4 step method to solve it.

Panorama Book New Releases

This page lists new releases of Denis Knight’s panoramic photography book, The Absolute Step-by-Step Guide to the Perfect Panorama.

More Panorama Photo Shooting Tips

Continuing our series of articles about panoramic photography for beginners, this article contains seven more photo shooting tips to help you create the perfect panorama. In this article you’ll learn how to shoot panoramas without a tripod, which camera mode to use when shooting for panoramas, and more.

Panorama Photo Shooting Tips

Continuing our series about panoramic photography for beginners, in this article you’ll learn seven simple secrets about how to shoot your photographs to give you the best results when you stitch them together into a panorama. By applying these simple techniques, you’ll be able to come back from your next vacation with some unique images that really do capture the grandeur of the sights you’ve seen.

What Do You Need to Create a Panorama?

In this series of articles, we’re exploring how beginners can create their own ultra wide angle panoramic images using the technique of stitched panoramic photography. By learning this simple technique, you’ll be able to come back from your next vacation with some unique images that really do capture the grandeur of the sights you’ve seen. So what do you need to create your own panoramic images? This article has the answers.

What is a Panorama?

How often have you come home from your vacation with dozens or even hundreds of photos, only to feel disappointed that somehow your snapshots never seem to capture the grandeur of the sights you’ve seen? The problem is, your camera can only capture one third or less of the majestic spectacle your eyes can see. But there is a solution. You can come home from your next vacation with some fantastic ultra wide angle photographs. The solution: panoramic photography.